Author Topic: Study Shows Attending Religious Services Cuts Death Risk by Almost 20%  (Read 3801 times)

thad1601

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Study Shows Attending Religious Services Cuts Death Risk by Almost 20%
« Reply #2 on: June 27, 2011, 08:07:51 PM »
I think that this is a very interesting study.  I to am not sure why there is such a large difference is mortality rates among church and non church attendees.  I think that it may have to do with having a lower stress level.  Also the people who go to church in most cases are far less likely to drink, smoke, or do drugs.  As they believe that they body is a temple and treat it as such.  I think that there is a correlation between going to church and mortality not a causation. 
« Last Edit: July 14, 2011, 05:05:39 PM by JC Spencer »

Offline JC Spencer

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Study Shows Attending Religious Services Cuts Death Risk by Almost 20%
« Reply #1 on: November 23, 2008, 10:53:01 AM »
Comments by J. C. Spencer

Cardiovascular events and overall mortality rates decreased by nearly 20% for those attending religious services.  The subjects included 92,395 women ranging in age from 50 to 79 over a 7.7 year time period monitored by trained physicians.  Strength and comfort played a role in physical benefits.

The investigators concluded that although religious behavior is associated with a reduction in death rates, the physical relationships leading to that effect are not yet understood and require further investigation.

The caring support from others significantly decreases worry, doubt, fear, and anxiety and undoubtedly contributes to a better well being. These factors do not require a religious experience any more than bear cubs huddling together with their mother.  To them, maybe it is a religious experience. The gambit of religious events range from water to oil to the true fruit of the Vine.  I have long contended that it is not religion, it is a relationship.

The Endowment for Medical Research is seeking a grant to conduct a serious followup study in lowering the mortality rate based on relationships and faith.  The following report establishes a baseline and establishes that there is much yet not understood or misunderstood and that further investigation is needed.  The size of the grant or grants will determine how religion and relationships are translated into biological factors for survival.

I am excited about the discovery and reporting on the physical and mental benefits of personal relationships and those who have a personal relationship with our Lord.  Some aspects of this research is reported in my ebook, Expand Your Mind - Improve Your Brain.  This 500 page text book references well over 700 MDs, PhDs, scientists, researchers, and educators in the fields of glycomics (the study of sugars) and brain function.

The Endowment for Medical Research Inc is a 501(c)(3) non-profit faith based scientific research, educational, Public Charity.  More about The Endowment is available at www.endowmentmed.org

Now for the report.

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Attending religious services can reduce mortality risk by approximately 20 percent, a new study from Yeshiva University has revealed.

The research team led by Eliezer Schnall, Ph.D., clinical assistant professor of psychology at Yeshiva College of Yeshiva University analysed the religious practices of 92,395 women aged 50 to79, participating in the Women Health Initiative.

After examining the prospective association of religious affiliation, religious service attendance, and strength and comfort derived from religion with subsequent cardiovascular events and overall rates of mortality, the researchers found that those attending religious services showed a 20 pct decrease in death risk.

“Interestingly, the protection against mortality provided by religion cannot be entirely explained by expected factors that include enhanced social support of friends or family, lifestyle choices and reduced smoking and alcohol consumption,” said Dr. Schnall, who was lead author of the study.

“There is something here that we don’t quite understand. It is always possible that some unknown or unmeasured factors confounded these results,” he added.

The participants answered questions about baseline health conditions and religiosity and were followed by WHI researchers for an average of 7.7 years, with potential study outcomes of cardiovascular events and mortality adjudicated by trained physicians.

The investigators concluded that although religious behaviour is associated with a reduction in death rates, the physical relationships leading to that effect are not yet understood and require further investigation.

“The next step is to figure out how the effect of religiosity is translated into biological mechanisms that affect rates of survival,” said Smoller.

“However, we do not infer causation even from a prospective study, as that can only be done through a clinical trial,” he added.

The findings are published in Psychology and Health.
Source: ANI  (Their article may have been removed.)
« Last Edit: October 19, 2012, 01:27:03 PM by JC Spencer »